Britain’s Got Talent finalist sent death threats by racists

By Will Brook

A stand-up comedian who reached the final of a major national talent competition has received race-related abuse and death threats from viewers.

Nabil Abdulrashid, 35, of Croydon, this year reached the final of Britain’s Got Talent thanks to his brand of satirical comedy.

Judge Alesha Dixon pressed her golden buzzer during his first audition, which meant father-of-two Mr Abdulrashid instantly won himself a place in the semi-final.

The public then voted him into the final, which aired on ITV on October 10.

Race and religion were recurring themes in his performances, and Mr Abdulrashid’s mocking of racists resulted in the show receiving 3,000 complaints to broadcast regulators Ofcom.

Mr Abdulrashid told The Guardian: “The hate has been vile. I’ve had death threats. I’ve had racist abuse from people, all kinds of stuff.

“I was ready for it, I was warned about it.”

An Ofcom spokesman said: “The comedian’s satirical take on his life experiences as a black Muslim was likely to have been within audience expectations,” and complaints were rejected.

Mr Abdulrashid tweeted: “Funny how I made fun of lefties, too, but so far it’s not them wishing death on me or sending me abuse…hmmm who were the snowflakes again?”

He said in a separate tweet: “I’m just happy I’ve kept workers at Ofcom from being made redundant. I’m a hero and should be appreciated for my contribution to the economy. @Ofcom you’re welcome.”

The comic, who came fourth in the competition, was originally born in north London, but then lived in Kaduna, Nigeria, before moving back to England in 2006 to settle in South Croydon.

Pictured top: Nabil Abdulrashid on the Britain’s Got Talent stage

 


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