Duke’s visit to children’s hospital

BY NEWS REPORTER
news@slpmedia.co.uk

The Duke of Cambridge visited Evelina London Children’s Hospital on Thursday to celebrate the national roll-out of a scheme to help ex-servicemen and women find employment in the NHS.

Step into Health provides a pathway from the military into the many career opportunities in the NHS and is supported by the Duke’s charity, The Royal Foundation.

The Duke of Cambridge meeting medical students during a visit to the Evelina London Children’s Hospital in London, to celebrate the national rollout of the ‘Step into Health’ programme.

His Royal Highness met veterans who are now working at Guy’s and St Thomas’, which includes Evelina London Children’s Hospital, as well as patients and their families. He heard how mentoring and work experience placements organised through Step into Health had helped veterans go on to secure permanent jobs.

Sir Hugh Taylor, chairman at Guy’s and St Thomas’, said: “Life back on civvy street can be a daunting prospect after years in the armed forces. Step into Health recognises that the skills and values developed whilst serving in the military can be readily transferred into a career in the NHS.

The Duke of Cambridge meets nurses during a visit to the Evelina London Children’s Hospital in London, to celebrate the national rollout of the ‘Step into Health’ programme.

“I am extremely proud that we have been able to employ so many excellent veterans, as well as providing opportunity and support to members of the veterans’ community who were struggling to cope in civilian life.

“It was a real privilege to introduce the Duke to those members of staff who have that forces background as well as our team that run this important programme.”

Neil McKie, Deputy Service Manager, is a former army officer who spent seven years in the Armed Forces before working as assistant service manager in the Dental Department at Guy’s, and his current post at Evelina London Children’s Hospital.

The Duke of Cambridge meets patients during a visit to the Evelina London Children’s Hospital in London, to celebrate the national rollout of the ‘Step into Health’ programme.

Neil said of meeting the Duke of Cambridge, who he trained with at Sandhurst: “Being ex-military the Duke understands what it’s like to leave the Armed Forces.

“I said to him that when I left the army, and was reassessing my life, I realised that what drives me is not money. What drives me is the people like the five-year-old boy we met today who is going down to surgery.

“I see it time and time again as I walk through the hospital. The people who rely on our services. That’s what gets me up in the morning. I want to do my bit to help.

“There are ex-service people who can add value to the NHS. It’s been proven by people like me and the other ex-military here today.”

Guy’s and St Thomas’ has employed 12 people through Step into Health since 2015, when it was chosen as one of five host Trusts to pilot the scheme.

The Duke of Cambridge arrives for a visit to the Evelina London Children’s Hospital in London, to celebrate the national rollout of the ‘Step into Health’ programme.

Through collaborating with 10 NHS organisations across London and the south east the Guy’s and St Thomas’-led pilot has employed a total of 34 former armed services personnel in the NHS, provided 120 work placements and supported 257 members of the armed forces.

After leaving Evelina London Children’s Hospital, the Duke travelled to the national launch, hosted by NHS Employers at Chandos House, Mayfair, where he gave a speech on the importance and impact of the programme.

Step into Health is led by NHS Employers, and supported by the Royal Foundation, Health Education England, NHS Improvement, NHS England, the Careers Transition Partnership and the charity Walking with the Wounded. It also helps the spouses and dependants of ex-servicemen and women find employment in the NHS.


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